Azure Content Hero and Community Hero


On 15 May 2020 I was received Azure Heros badger Content Hero and today 19 June 2020 I received my second Azure Heros badger Community Hero I am So proud 💪 of my activity and contribution to SQL Server and Azure 👏 Glad to know that my contribution to the community is appreciated. Next step is Azure Mentor Badger and Azure Inclusive Leader Badger Coming Soon https://www.microsoft.com/skills/azureheroes

Content Hero badgers are given out for sharing valuable knowledge at conferences, meetups, or other events. Recipients of this rare award have created original content, sample code, or learning resources and documented and shared their experiences and lessons to help others to build on Azure

Azure Content Hero

Community Hero badgers are given out for contributing materially by organizing meetups or conferences or by sharing content and being an active member of the community

Azure Community Hero

For More Information About My Azure articles and posts check here ➡️ https://lnkd.in/edn6nyY

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Enabling Auto-Failover Group on Azure SQL


Today in Article I will explain How we can enable the Auto Failover group on Azure SQL and what is different between Auto-Failover Group and Active Geo-Replication in Azure SQL. Before starting in How to implement the Azure SQL Auto Failover Group I recommend you to take a look on this ➡️ POST to understand How you can configure  Active Geo-Replication on Azure SQL and for more Azure SQL articles check this ➡️ LINK  and for more other Azure Posts and articles check this ➡️ LINK for all of my azure articles

  • Active Geo-Replication VS Failover Group
  • How to enable Auto-Failover Group on Azure Single SQL Server
  • Check the Failover Group Configuration and Connections
  • Test the Failover
  • Conclusion
  • Resources
  • Follow Me on Social Accounts
Continue reading “Enabling Auto-Failover Group on Azure SQL”

How to create a SQL Database in Azure


How to create a SQL Database in Azure

(A Step by step procedure)

I am writing this blog and explaining how to create a database in Azure. As we know that Azure is a cloud computing service provided by Microsoft and is becoming popular in the world. As a DBA we need to know how to work in a cloud computing environment and therefore for the ease I providing a step by step solution for creating a database in Azure.

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Explanation:

First of all we need to login to Azure portal and need to check for SQL Database options as it will be on the left hand side as given in picture below.

SQL Database Options

As soon as we click on SQL database option, a new windows will open up as given in picture below:

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Here we can see in this picture that there is no database available. Now we have to create a new database and for that we need to click on Add button on the top as shown in picture.

As we click on add button so it will display a new windows which requires the information to fill in to create a database.

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Here we need to provide the information as database name, subscription, resource group (if existing then use that and no need to create a new resource group for each database), another option here elastic pool which is already discussed in my previous blog , go through if not read

https://mirzahusain.wordpress.com/2018/08/06/sql-database-as-a-service-in-azure/

As this is a test database which I have created so not using elastic pool and simple creating a standalone single database in Azure. Rest settings pricing and collation we need to set here as per our requirements or choose default.

One more thing which is important that is location we need to choose as I have chosen East US , you may choose as per your company requirement and policies, for the test purpose you may choose any location and just try and hit.

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Check and fill all the option carefully as shown in the above picture and then hit the create button.

The deployment will start to create the database. I have created here the database named as “MirzaDB”. You would be getting the alert in the alert section as soon as deployment succeeded.

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Now database has been created and we can explore it by checking its size and other details as below in different pictures.

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Looking forward your likes & comments!

Mirza Husain

 

 

Improve SQL Server Performance with Compression


SQL Server data compression is now available in all editions of SQL Server, starting with 2016 SP1.

In this Article, you will not only know how data compression will save space, you’ll also find out how compression can sometimes improve performance as well.

Space Savings vs. Performance

When I first heard about compression back in 2008, my first thought is that it would have a big performance penalty. Compression would save disk space, but it would probably decrease performance as the data was compressed and decompressed. It turns out that compression can improve performance instead. Because compressed data fits in a smaller number of data pages, there are decreased I/O requirements. Since I/O is generally the bottleneck in SQL Server, this can improve performance. Compressed data also has a decreased memory requirement. When querying compressed data, a smaller number of pages will be copied to the buffer pool. The one area that is impacted is CPU. You do need to have some CPU headroom because compression will require some additional CPU resources.

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The good thing is that if the workload is reasonably tuned, many SQL Server instances have more CPU resources than they need. One note of caution here. Don’t look to compression as the solution to solving major performance issues. You need to look at physical resources, configuration, indexing, and query tuning. The point I’m trying to make is that decreased I/O and better memory utilization will benefit the workload in many cases.

Continue reading “Improve SQL Server Performance with Compression”

SQL Server performance – measure Disk Response Time


Introduction

As DBAs, we all get to the point where we are asked to setup a new server for a particular environment. Setting up a new server is not a big thing but giving the answer to the question that “how well it will work” might be tricky.

There are tons of items which we can set up to measure how well the newly installed server will receive a response, but here I will discuss one of the most valuable resources of the server “Disk.” Most often the disk is not measured correctly, or I have seen environments where the disk response time has never been measured. I will discuss here a tool from Microsoft which is very handy and can solve your problem very quickly. The diskspd.exe!

It’s the superseding version of SQLIO which was previously used to measure IO response time for the disk. The source code of diskspd.exe is hosted on GitHub. You can download this free utility from Microsoft’s website using this link.

After you download the utility, you will get a zip file. Just unzip the file, and it will give you the folders and files as shown in the below screenshot. You will-will need the eye of diskspd inside the folder “amd64fre” if you have a SQL Server 64-bit version (most of us will be having this).

To complete this article please check it here

 

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